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Pitching your tent

PITCHING

Avoid low areas, which are likely to collect water. Always choose a site with good drainage. Inspect the site and remove any sharp or protruding objects that could damage the tent floor.

All tents need to be staked down to keep them from blowing away. Securing the tent by placing heavy objects inside is not just adequate.

PITCHING THE TENT BODY

DRAPE FLY OVER

Once the tent body is erected, stake it out before the fly is put on. This enables you to square the tent up to ensure that the fly goes on properly and that the seams align with the frame. Pull the base of the tent taut between each web stake out loop or ring & pin. Make sure that all corners are square. It is important that you don’t stake the tent out too tightly. You will know it’s too tight, if the door zippers cannot be easily operated.

With the tent properly staked, drape the fly over the frame, attach its tent connection points and stake down any pullouts. The above is not applicable for tents with external pole sleeves and inner tents attached to the fly-sheet.

REMOVE PEGS

Do not attempt to remove the Pegs by pulling on the tent becket loop, as this could cause the fabric to tear. The best way is to pry on the stake itself.

PITCHING IN SPECIAL CONDITIONS

Sand: 

Long broad pegs with plenty of surface area are ideal in loose, sandy soil.

Hard, Rocky, or Frozen Soil: 

Steel pegs work well in these conditions. Store steel pegs separately. If stored with your tent, the sharp edges can cut the fabric. Steel pegs can also leave rust stains, which might damage your tent.

Snow: 

Use “dead man” anchors: bury objects (branches, tent bags, or stuff sacks filled with snow) that have a great deal of surface area. Tents can also be tied to snowshoes, skis, or ski poles, which are stuck in the snow.

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